Mild Cognitive Impaired (MiCI) Science

7th Grade Science

Life Science

 

Standard: Cells (CE) All students will apply an understanding of cells to the functioning of multi-cellular organisms, including how cells grow, develop and reproduce.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.CE.m.EB01

L.CE.FI.EB.III.1.m.1a

Recognize that all living things are made of cells: some consist of a single cell and some are multi-cellular. 

 

Key concepts: Differentiate between animal/plant cells by shape (existence of cell wall); single-cell organisms vs. multi-cellular organisms.

 

Real-world contexts: Onion skin cell vs. cheek cell; paramecium vs. human.

Identify that plants have a  cell wall and animals do not.

Identify the differences between animal and plant cells by shape and cell wall.

 

 

MI-Access

See Benchmark for Specific EGLCE

Classroom activities and teacher developed assessment(s).

 

 

 

 

  STANDARD: CELLS (CE)

All students will apply an understanding of cells to the functioning of multi-cellular organisms, including how cells grow, develop and reproduce.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.CE.m.EB03

L.CE.FI.EB.III.1.m.2a

Identify that plants and animals have specialized cells. 

 

Key concepts: Animal reproduction cells and plant reproductive cells, skin cells, blood cells, root cells, and leaf cells.

 

Real-world contexts:  Red blood cells/white blood cells, sperm cells, egg cells.

 

 

 

 

·   Explore the various cell types (blood, plant cells, root, leaf, reproductive cells etc) and tell their function.

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ORGANIZATION OF LIVING THINGS (OR)

All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.OR.m.EB01ADD

L.OR.FI.EB.III.2.e.1ADDm

Identify characteristics and/or functions of observable body parts in a variety of animals. 

 

Key concepts: Observable characteristics—fur, scales, feathers, horns, claws, beaks, teeth, skeleton, muscles; functions—insulation, support, movement, food-getting, protection.

 

Real-world contexts: Caring for pets, health care, visiting the dentist.

Understands and uses terms to describe the characteristics of animals (vertebrate, invertebrate, cold blooded, warm-blooded, carnivore,

herbivore, etc.).

 

Can name and describe the characteristics of the main classifications of animals:

1.           Mollusks.

2.      Echinoderms.

3.      Insects.

4.      Spiders.

5.      Fish.

6.      Reptiles.

7.      Amphibians.

8.      Birds.

9.      Mammals.

 

Understands that animals have special protective devices to preserve their species.

1.      Run - have speed and agility to escape.

2.      Hide - camouflage, protective coloration.

3.      Weapons - fangs, teeth, claws, poison, etc.

 

 

 

Knows that animals live in environments/habitats suited to their needs

1.      Food.

 

2.      Shelter.

 

3.      Temperature/Climate.

 

4.      Area/Space.

 

Understands that animals are living things and a necessary part of our

environment.

1.      Food.

2.      Skins/Hides.

3.      Workers.

4.      Companions

5.      Parts of the food chain.

 

Understands the importance of conservation in protecting animals from

extinction

 

 

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ORGANIZATION OF LIVING THINGS (OR)

All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.OR.m.EB01

L.OR.FI.EB.III.2.m.1a

Compare and/or classify organisms in major groups based on their structure. 

 

Key concepts: Characteristics used for classification—reptiles/ mammals, flowering plant vs. non-flowering plant.

 

Real-world contexts: Visiting a zoo, school garden, fishing.

Understands and identifies plant classification according to similarities.

1.      Simple plants - algae, fungi.

2.      Land plants (more complex).

a.      Mosses.

b.      Ferns.

c.      Seed plants.

1.      Flowering.

2.      Cone-bearing.

Understands the importance of conservation to protect plants from extinction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ORGANIZATION OF LIVING THINGS (OR)

All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.OR.m.EB03

L.OR.FI.EB.III.2.m.2a

Identify stages of the life cycle of flowering plants. 

 

Key concepts: Flowering plant parts—roots, stems, leaves, flowers, seeds, processes—germination.

 

Real-world contexts: Gardening, visiting an orchard.

 

Understands the life cycle of flowering plants from seed to plant, flowers,

fruit, seed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ORGANIZATION OF LIVING THINGS (OR)

All students will investigate and explain how living things obtain and use energy.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.OR.m.EB04

L.OR.FI.EB.III.2.m.3a

Explain where the plants make and store food.  

 

Key concepts: Make food in leaves, store food in roots.

 

Real-world contexts: Food preparation (such as, What part of the carrot do you eat?).

Can identify the parts of plants and their functions

Roots - soak up water and nutrients, hold the plant in place.

Stems - support the plant, send water and nutrients to leaves.

Leaves - photosynthesis, respiration

Knows the requirements for plant growth and practices these:

Good soil.

Correct amount of sunshine, and water.

 

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Standard: Organization of Living Things (OR) All students will analyze how parts of living things are adapted to carry out specific functions.

 

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.OR.m.EB05

L.OR.FI.EB.III.2.m.4a

Identify how selected systems and processes work together in animals.

 

Key concepts: Systems/processes—digestion/ excretion, skeletal/muscular.

 

Real-world contexts: Exercising (Where does your food go?).

 

The Student...

 

Understands the systems of the body, including their functions and major organs.

Skeletal.

Muscular.

 Circulatory.

 Respiratory.

 Digestive.

 Nervous.

 Reproductive (also see Personal Adjustment-Sexuality Unit).

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ORGANIZATION OF LIVING THINGS (OR)

All students will analyze how parts of living things are adapted to carry out specific functions.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: HEREDITY (HE)

All students will investigate and explain how characteristics of living things are passed on through generations.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

S.FI.L.HE.m.EB01

L.HE.FI.EB.III.3.m.1a

Identify the characteristics of living things that are passed on through generations. 

 

Key concepts: Reproductive cells—egg, sperm, hereditary information.

 

Real-world contexts: Family, pets, gardening.

 

Have a basic understanding about heredity.

 

They will understand that both parents provide characteristics that are passed on to future generations.

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: HEREDITY (HE)

All students will explain why organisms within a species are different from one another.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.HE.m.EB02

L.HE.FI.EB.III.3.m.2a

Identify how heredity and environment may affect human characteristics. 

 

Key concepts: Traits—inherited, acquired.

 

Real-world contexts: Personal health habits—eating, smoking, alcohol.

They will have a basic understanding of the importance of an accurate family medical history regarding health concerns that may be passed on to future offspring.

 

 

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STANDARD: HEREDITY (HE)

All students will explain how new traits can be established by changing or manipulating genes.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: EVOLUTION (EV)

All students will explain how scientists construct and scientifically test theories concerning the origin of life and evolution of species

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EV.m.EB01

L.EV.FI.EB.III.4.m.1a

Explain how fossils provide evidence about the nature of ancient life.

 

Key concepts: Types of evidence—fossil, extinct, ancient, modern life forms.

 

Real-world contexts: Visiting a museum, finding Petoskey stones.

Identify fossils and discuss their origin.

They will understand how fossils provide information about life many years ago.

 

 

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STANDARD: EVOLUTION (EV)

All students will compare ways that living organisms are adapted (suited) to survive and reproduce in their environments and explain how species change through time.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EV.m.EB02

L.EV.FI.EB.III.4.m.2a

Identify how species may become extinct. 

 

Key concepts: Environmental change, variation in populations, reproductive success.

 

Real-world contexts: Pets, visiting a museum.

 

Understand the concept of extinction.  They will identify reasons that species may become extinct.

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will explain how parts of an ecosystem are related and how they interact.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.m.EB01

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.1a

Describe common patterns of relationships among populations.

 

Key concepts: Participants and relationships—predator, prey, parasite, competition, mutually beneficial.

 

Real-world contexts: Nature walk, visiting a park.

Identify components of the food web and the relationship that living organisms have with each other.

Students will identify predator/prey relationships.

 

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STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will explain how energy is distributed to living things in an ecosystem.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.m.EB02

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.2a

Identify and/or describe that organisms acquire energy directly or indirectly from sunlight. 

 

Key concepts: Sunlight, plants, food, photosynthesis, producers, consumers, food webs. 

 

Real-world contexts: Gardening, lawn care.

Students will identify consumer/producer

relationships including the concept that energy is provided to organisms directly or indirectly by the sun.

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will investigate and explain how communities of living things change over a period of time.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.m.EB03

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.3a

Identify the effects of changes in one population in a food web on other populations. 

 

Key concepts: Natural balance (organism, population, community), introduction of non-native species.

 

Real-world contexts: Wildlife, landscaping, boating.

 

Identify how populations of the food web can be changed (for better or worse) when change is introduced in the food web.

 

They will understand the concept of natural balance.

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will investigate and explain how communities of living things change over a period of time.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.m.EB04

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.4a

Identify the likely changes of a given ecosystem over time. 

 

Key concepts: Stages (pioneer community-climax community).

 

Real-world contexts: Landscaping, camping, farming.

Understand that change can be introduced to an ecosystem that impacts organisms (positive and negative).

Students will be able to give examples of likely outcomes.

 

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STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will describe how materials cycle through an ecosystem and get reused in the environment.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

 

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will analyze how humans and the environment interact.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.m.EB05

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.5a

Identify how humans use and benefit from plant and animal materials. 

 

Key concepts: Materials from plants, including wood, paper, cotton, linen, starch, rubber, wax, and oils.  Materials from animals, including leather, wool, fur, oils, and wax.

 

Real-world contexts: Clothing, building materials, and medicines.

Understands that plants are living things and are necessary for life on earth.

1.      Food.

2.      Building materials.

3.      Produce oxygen.

4.      Medicine.

5.      Fuel.

6.      Shelter for animals.

7.      Protect soil.

8.      Cloth.

 

 

MI-Access

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARD: ECOSYSTEMS (EC)

All students will analyze how humans and the environment interact.

Benchmark

Students Will

Text Reference

Suggested Activities/Assessment

 

S.FI.L.EC.h.EB05

L.EC.FI.EB.III.5.m.6a

Describe ways in which humans alter the environment.

 

Key concepts: Agriculture, land use, renewable and non-renewable resource development, resource use, solid waste, toxic waste.  Biodiversity. 

 

Real-world contexts: Farming, hunting, planting trees.

Identify positive and negative ways that humans impact/alter the environment and likely/possible outcomes of those changes (farming, pollution, clear-cutting the land for building)

 

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